Now that we’ve got a full month of pumpkin spice under our belts, it’s time to shift our focus toward All Hallows’ Eve, better known as Halloween

New Moon Rising halloween

Now that we’ve got a full month of pumpkin spice under our belts, it’s time to shift our focus toward All Hallows’ Eve, better known as Halloween.

By Shelley Sakala

In some parts of the country Halloween signals that the harvest is moving along at full speed. In Phoenix, however, Halloween means we’ve got about 11 more months of summer. Who knows, maybe we’ll catch a break this month.

Halloween costumes in Phoenix can be a little tricky––no pun intended. It can be anywhere from 75 degrees to 95 degrees on Halloween night. And rainfall isn’t out of the question for late October. So while that adorable, fur lined, full-length bunny costume looks cute on your kid, you may find yourself administering Pedialyte sippy cups to your heat-exhausted child. Or you may be following your little zombie with an umbrella over his head. It all comes down to the weather on the big day. My best advice is to pay close attention to the forecast from your local TV meteorologist. Those people are brilliant, and they know what they’re doing.

Two galactic events are happening this Halloween. First of all, it lands on a Monday, which means you have to rush home from work to finish up the costumes. And don’t even think about watching Monday Night Football. Set your DVR and take your kid out for some free candy. Secondly, this Halloween will feature a new moon. If you had one of those cool watches from the 90s showing the phases of the moon then you’d know this is the start of the lunar cycle. A new moon is basically the opposite of a full moon. It’s invisible because the illuminated side is facing away from us. An easy way to understand this celestial phenomenon is to stand outside facing the sun. Lift your hand like you’re waving hello and block the sunlight from your eyes. While the palm of your hand is well-lit, the back of your hand is dark. That’s essentially what happens with the moon. The good news is that there’s no full moon to inspire the neighborhood delinquents or activate the werewolves. The bad news is that the streets will be considerably darker at night. Because of this, I’ve put together a section on trick-or-treat safety to help keep everyone safe this Halloween.

TIPS FOR TRICK-OR-TREAT SAFETY (PARENTS)

Excited, sugared-up children running around car-lined streets in the dark with an opportunity to collect as much free candy as possible––what could possibly go wrong? This is the one night when every mom and dad should be competing for the title of Parent of the Year.

  • Stick to the sidewalks: Have your kiddos work an entire block before crossing over to the next block. When you reduce the crossings, you reduce the risk.
  • Keep your head on a swivel: Your little Queen Elsa will look exactly like the other 15 Queen Elsas. Avoid scary moments by constantly keeping tabs on your child.
  • Stay visible: A roll of reflective tape from the home improvement store is a great resource for increasing visibility. A few strips on the back of a costume or on your kid’s sneakers will turn your child into a beacon of safety.
  • Creative costuming: Any costume involving lights, reflectors, or sparkles is a plus. Think robots, angels, fairies, and rainbow unicorns. That all-black ninja costume might look cool, but it’s the same color as darkness. And that’s not what you need when you’re trying to be seen.
  • The $1 solution: Pick up a few glow sticks or glow necklaces from the dollar store. It’s a super-cheap way to add some visibility (and fun) to your child’s evening.
  • Practice what you preach: Add some reflective tape, reflective running shoes, and even a glow stick to your wardrobe. Because of the height difference, drivers will spot you before they spot your kids.
  • Light up the night: Invest in light-up sneakers for your child. Amazon has thousands of them for sale, starting at less than $20.

TIPS FOR TRICK-OR-TREAT SAFETY (DRIVERS)

You’re used to tearing out of your neighborhood in your lifted truck while blasting Metallica, and now you find your path blocked by absent-minded families and kids who aren’t yours. Total frustration, bro. I feel ya’. But for one night a year, maybe ease off the gas pedal and lay off the horn. Nobody goes to the hospital, nobody goes to jail, and you just might score points with your judgy neighbors.

 

October Halloweather

Average high: 87°

Average low: 57°

Record high: 96°

Record low: 36°

Precipitation: 0.57 inches

TRICK-OR-TREAT START TIME

Official sunset time on Halloween will be 5:36 p.m.

Shelley Sakala is a meteorologist and former weather anchor/reporter at ABC 15 who still enjoys talking about the weather. She's now a Realtor with HomeSmart Elite and an 85085 resident. Learn more about her at ShelleySakala.com.

Shelley Sakala is a meteorologist and former weather anchor/reporter at ABC 15 who still enjoys talking about the weather. She’s now a Realtor with HomeSmart Elite and an 85085 resident. Learn more about her at ShelleySakala.com.

 

© 2018 85085 Magazine. A Division of Strickbine Publishing Inc.

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